Metamorphosis or Dysregulation Within the Communication and Feeding Networks of Earth

Ash Coates

99% of biota on earth is microbial in nature and all forms of life contain symbiotic networks of fungi, bacteria and viruses that work to communicate and trade between one another in languages made up of chemical and hormonal transmissions.
James MacAllister says, “We are all Lichens, products of networks of symbiosis.”
My work is a visual representation of these worlds, things that exist beneath the surface and the unseen energy that is passed throughout these ecosystems, sending messages from one living thing to the next and creating symbiosis between micro and macro worlds within the biosphere. Lynn Margulis is well known for her pioneering work on Endosymbiosis, a process in which living organisms share genetic information via communication networks between bacteria, fungi and viruses. She contended that these systems of symbiosis are a major driving force behind evolution. These ideas that were once thought of as science fiction are now predominantly thought of as the rule rather than the exception.
In a world of synthetic waste and debris, are microbes actively evolving to create symbiosis with this inorganic matter?
In my work I present landscapes, but they are just as much external as they are internal. They exist in both places at once, on multiple timelines and parallel dimensions. Things inside things, locality becomes obscured and everything is alive.