Sepideh Majidi ---

0Ocean

Part one:Island

Part Two: Ship

Part Three: Time & Space

Part four: Movement

Part Five: Ocean



In this particular moment, the observer is traversing the region of pure understanding, the land of truth (an attractive word), an island surrounded by a wide and stormy ocean, with unchangeable limits, where everything is proper--proper measure is in proper relation to its proper components to make this recipe of the Localized Observer. Either Kant is thinking about leaving the island or not. He is taking a look at what’s surrounding him, and from there he brings us back to take a look at this particular island, which is locating us within a center in the stormy ocean. Can we assume an ever shifting position throughout the universe? In regard to any type of movement, he is holding back. Should we travel? Should we ever move? Is every possible country on the same island?

 

[ ocean [ [ island-observer [ sensation-sensibility [ intuition] imagination] thoughts and understanding] reason, concept]]

Reference to: Immanuel Kant -Critique of Pure Reason

The Transcendental Doctrine of the Power of Judgment (A nalytic of Principles)

Chapter III: Of the Ground of the Division of all Objects into Phenomena and Noumena-p 338

In the question of locality vs globality, we cannot assume that we have the map or access to the universal or global. In fact, all we can do is to start from the  local position, which is also as unknown to us as what we call the global.  As in the allegory of the island, we have to start from this remote locality. This is the very idea of the transcendental subject, who thinks she is floating on the ocean of transcendental thought. But transcendental thought is an island itself, and at this point we are not even aware that it is, in fact, an island. There are many fictional theoretical allegories about this, such as wolf-children, who are not raised in human society. How can we know who we are? How can we know there are other agents and other islands? The point of these stories is that even if the agent is born on a desert island, disconnected from human society, he still has a chance to connect back to human society. Even if the locality of the thought is parochial, using different methods, we can turn this island into an infinite ocean of possibilities. Or we can make a boat and traverse the ocean to arrive at other islands or archipelagos. As humans, all we can ever do is to start from an island. Like Friday, from Robinson Crusoe, or Hayy ibn Yaqzan, how can we ever know about the rest of the universe?

 

I am attempting to work with the idea of movement from the island to the ocean, since the ocean is the different type of reality. The idea of navigating through the ocean, in order to connect to other agents requires a methodology to move from an island of locality to the ocean. It requires certain specific ranges of navigational methods that can allow me to navigate the bad weather, shifting tides, through night and day, to arrive at other islands, and meet other islanders. 

Part 1: Island

Those people who set sail from the island to the ocean always abide by certain rules, which signify both the laws of the ocean and the rules of the island’s subject.

This is the transcendental subject, who thinks she is essentially floating in the infinite ocean of transcendental thought; that everything is available to her, freely. But the transcendental thought is of course an island itself, so she’s not aware that she is, in fact, herself an island, anchored by virtue of the contingent constitution of her transcendental structure. Just as a ship moored in the water thinks that--simply because it is a ship--it is floating freely in the ocean, whereas it’s actually anchored, though not conscious of it.

Each stage of my story indicates a seemingly gradual shift from the heart of the island to the outside, steadily gaining more freedom of movement, and then facilitating access to the inner workings of the island and its integration into the structure of the ocean, with relations parallel to the observer and to the whole.

Even as an inhabitant of the island, I remain a stranger, troubled by the unsettling relations between part and totality, internal and external, particular and universal, fringe and center.

To me, it appears thatthe island is the edge of an unknown world.

Until she builds a boat and sets sail in the infinite ocean, she doesn’t know where the edge actually is. To be at the edge of the world she must live in the true ocean. But, how can we ever postulate the edge of the ocean?

 

This is about the locality and the globality of the transcendental subject. We can think about this locality exactly like an island in an infinite ocean. In this sense, the island thought or the island thinking is at once at the center and the fringe; the threshold and the hinge. The island is just the fringe of the ocean, nothing else. But from the perspective of the island itself, it appears to be at the center.

The major changes that occur take place within the observer, whose thresholds of understanding are ramified by encounters with different islands and different          islanders, and with all the other animal forms that also exist on this specific island.


 

For a thought to become a thought it should communicate with other thoughts—there is no private thought.

While Reason is pushing forward the limits of my imagination, my imagination is falling apart by the magnitude of the ocean; the high tides are breaking my borders of control.

It might be a mistake to take the observer's intelligence, as similar to other forms of animals, as a type of model which, despite its similarity, has an awareness that leads to accessing its mechanisms and functions, and categories which construct its cognition and therefore its reality. Although this agent or observer cannot step outside of this system, she has gained access and an understanding to its internal mechanism, which creates the possibility for the agent to be able to further revise, reconstruct and manipulate it, and hence challenge her cognition, and also her perceived reality.


 

 

This is caused by first realizing the difference, and then the similarity—by seeing herself as part of the world—between the observer's intelligence, as compared to other living beings inhabiting the environment.

The limited shores of this island can deceive us,

For the islander,

this is the only possibility for being.

This is the specific condition of the intelligence of our island-inhabiting observer…The Island is a metaphor for the transcendental constitution of the specific agent, in our case the human …creating a possibility that leads to a transformation of her environment in relation to the ocean.

For this, the observer needs several things: the conception of self, a conception of the environment, and conditions of possibilities of experience.

Are there other islands in the ocean, where other agents live, and other worlds can exist? Outside the limits of all the possible experiences within this territory, which understanding allows me to engage with? What conceptual creation leads to certain experiences unlike mine, and their representations?

I am evolutionarily wired, based on predation and predatory activity, reward and punishment, to see myself as this very sensible integrity--my body, my senses. The natural self is an illusion. There is no self; just the simulation that enables me to perform vital functions. Sex, reproduction, predation. And on top of this, I have a self, of which I am conscious. Not the sensible self, but the object of thinking, such that it can influence the ordinary sensible self, which is an illusion.

 

Gods and demons, subtle bodies--apparitions--with no sensible qualities. The new possibilities of thought, related not to Iconus, but to Nous, the intellect, the thought itself.

So, we can say she cannot separate from the island; they both have to transform interdependently. The local constitution of the transcendental subject (she) and the conditions of possibilities of this particular transcendental subject: the island itself. They do not exist with or without each other--their bodies, their sensible qualities, their configurations, and quantitative qualities.

Dimension, distance, form, extension--all relating to numbers--the mysticism of mathematics, the autonomous transformation of forms to other forms. Mathematics is disembodied. It is pure form, and only in pure form can it transform into other forms--forms that she desires, since form doesn't have a body, nor an extension in space.

According to the relation between thought and world, which addresses the islander  distinct from her context, the observer is built into the conditions of an external universe which, in turn, ceases to exist to us. Insofar as the islander is very limited, she is constituted and contingent.
 

“On this island I cannot dream about the ocean.” 

The islander can’t recognize the Being of the ocean. We are in the business of the primal question of philosophy: what is Being? We cannot talk about Being if we are a slave to our immediate senses and local transcendental constitution. If we take Being as infinite, we must also make ourselves as infinite. In so far as our senses are finite, we can only do that through forms of thinking. Which leads to the being that ceases to exist to us. It can only be talked about coherently because we have adequate cognitive resources to talk about such beings. In other words, Being is the designation of thinking.

 

She needs to understand the correlation between non-Being and Being. Thinking and Being.

The first, sketchy prototype of the agent—the “O0”—is an observer with an organic vessel constrained by self-organization, limited by her cognitive conditions and local ground on the terrestrial sphere. These conceptual grounds provide a space for the observer to reflect upon, and generate subjective and objective forms of realities, which might be—as a matter of fact—simulations of the island, or of the environment in which the agent inhabits.

 

The central relation between the O0 and the world brings about the possible existence of other centers into the narrative; many other centers, infinite vessels, capsules, containers, islands and agents, pure, composed, and self-contained, forever separate and invisible to one another, piling up and streaming in the fog. The fog is carrying them in the universal flux. The fog—what Kant demonstrated as a source of sensory perceptual illusion--fills the space between locals, blocking one from the other.

 

So from here I go to relations between all these infinite locale/s, as they exist in many dimensions, and how each locale is harnessing and transforming this relational force and system to construct its local ground anew. (This is a very hellish space).

In the next stage, the Observer_ O0 understands the defect and the limitation of her local space or particular transcendental constitution.

 

She also discovers the possibility of expansion within the infinite.

In the next stage, the agent, with the help of her particular transcendental structure--which is her available resources for navigation--discovers the movement of the vessel in the perilous space of the outside without the protection shield or her current horizon of perception. The observer uses the transcendental structure to see herself back in the safe space of locale/s simultaneously, as it's already in the stream of locals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Some Notes

Universality can be imposed on the local without any local constraints. There are examples of this as early as Kant. We can only talk about the particularity of observation, by way of general concepts. We never know anything about the things in themselves. To elaborate the different relations between items in the world we need the elaboration of general concepts and their relations. 

 

Basically, I’m trying to explore the model of experience and knowledge, from the time of Kant to new advancements in science and mathematics, and to analyze the reformulation of experiences. 

 

For that I’m turning around the metaphor of the island and ocean from Kant’s The Critique of Pure Reason and actually saying it is not a metaphor--it is, in fact, actually a model, and I’m exploring and redefining how this experiential model functions.

 

Notes:

In this particular moment, the observer is traversing the region of pure understanding, the land of truth (an attractive word), an island surrounded by a wide and stormy ocean, with unchangeable limits, where everything is proper--proper measure is in proper relation to its proper components to make this recipe of the Localized Observer. Either Kant is thinking about leaving the island or not. He is taking a look at what’s surrounding him, and from there he brings us back to take a look at this particular island, which is locating us within a center in the stormy ocean. Can we assume an ever shifting position throughout the universe? In regard to any type of movement, he is holding back. Should we travel? Should we ever move? Is every possible country on the same island?

 

[ ocean [ [ island-observer [ sensation-sensibility [ intuition] imagination] thoughts and understanding] reason, concept]]

Reference to: Immanuel Kant -Critique of Pure Reason

The Transcendental Doctrine of the Power of Judgment (A nalytic of Principles)

Chapter III: Of the Ground of the Division of all Objects into Phenomena and Noumena-p 338

In the question of locality vs globality, we cannot assume that we have the map or access to the universal or global. In fact, all we can do is to start from the  local position, which is also as unknown to us as what we call the global.  As in the allegory of the island, we have to start from this remote locality. This is the very idea of the transcendental subject, who thinks she is floating on the ocean of transcendental thought. But transcendental thought is an island itself, and at this point we are not even aware that it is, in fact, an island. There are many fictional theoretical allegories about this, such as wolf-children, who are not raised in human society. How can we know who we are? How can we know there are other agents and other islands? The point of these stories is that even if the agent is born on a desert island, disconnected from human society, he still has a chance to connect back to human society. Even if the locality of the thought is parochial, using different methods, we can turn this island into an infinite ocean of possibilities. Or we can make a boat and traverse the ocean to arrive at other islands or archipelagos. As humans, all we can ever do is to start from an island. Like Friday, from Robinson Crusoe, or Hayy ibn Yaqzan, how can we ever know about the rest of the universe?

I am attempting to work with the idea of movement from the island to the ocean, since the ocean is a different type of reality. The idea of navigating through the ocean, in order to connect to other agents requires a methodology to move from an island of locality to the ocean. It requires certain specific ranges of navigational methods that can allow me to navigate the bad weather, shifting tides, through night and day, to arrive at other islands, and meet other islanders

In this model we see that there is this whole idea of inside and outside, but after Husserl, with geometrical advances and special relativity, the whole concept of experience was reinvented, redefining the very nature of the world. And this goes back to the fact that the conditions of possibility of experience can be redefined, and can be seen as a different framework.

 

For example, in Part I of my research--Island_ Ocean--we have two types of agents as particular forms of experiences. Each of them has a different perspective of how we are seeing things. One is the island—which works with a priori concepts, and the other one is like a ship—which might not have a priori concepts, but has phenomenological experience. So I am basically designing or speculating on new and different forms of mobility and perspective, which leads to categories of phenomenological experience--from egocentric, to other open ocean types. Then, the relation between these new agents can also be discussed. 

 

Some notes:

This is the transcendental subject, who thinks she is essentially floating in the infinite ocean of transcendental thought; that everything is available to her, freely. But the transcendental thought is of course an island itself, so she’s not aware that she is, in fact, herself an island, anchored by virtue of the contingent constitution of her transcendental structure. Just as a ship moored in the water thinks that--simply because it is a ship--it is floating freely in the ocean, whereas it’s actually anchored, though not conscious of it.

Each stage of my story indicates a seemingly gradual shift from the heart of the island to the outside, steadily gaining more freedom of movement, and then facilitating access to the inner workings of the island and its integration into the structure of the ocean, with relations parallel to the observer and to the whole.

Even as an inhabitant of the island, I remain a stranger, troubled by the unsettling relations between part and totality, internal and external, particular and universal, fringe and center.

This is about the locality and the globality of the transcendental subject. We can think about this locality exactly like an island in an infinite ocean. In this sense, the island thought or the island thinking is at once at the center and the fringe; the threshold and the hinge. The island is just the fringe of the ocean, nothing else. But from the perspective of the island itself, it appears to be at the center.

According to the relation between thought and world, which addresses the islander  distinct from her context, the observer is built into the conditions of an external universe which, in turn, ceases to exist to us. Insofar as the islander is very limited, she is constituted and contingent.

“On this island I cannot dream about the ocean.” 

The islander can’t recognize the Being of the ocean. We are in the business of the primal question of philosophy: what is Being? We cannot talk about Being if we are a slave to our immediate senses and local transcendental constitution. If we take Being as infinite, we must also make ourselves as infinite. In so far as our senses are finite, we can only do that through forms of thinking. Which leads to the being that ceases to exist to us. It can only be talked about coherently because we have adequate cognitive resources to talk about such beings. In other words, Being is the designation of thinking.

She needs to understand the correlation between non-Being and Being. Thinking and Being. 

So, in Part II-- New Animal:

Some of the Notes

Here I started with Kant’s immobile ship/island and dismantled it, at the place where there is: Four-fold dialectical--zero--between magnitudes, negative and positive magnitudes.

Zero according to quantity

Zero according to quality

Zero according to relation

Zero according to modality

 

In which, something is being possible as a result of limiting function or a lack of something else, such as noumena, which is beyond the limit of knowledge, to create a limited and clear boundary for sensibility. Beyond this limit we have only logical possibility, and not sensible reality. Also, in the island we deal with the absence of phenomenal reality--reality is the concept of an object which has been given to us through our senses--we only have senses in absence of matter. Also, within the manifold of intuition, reality is the concept of the intuited; we have absence of the object of intuition, and in fact absence of matter, only imagination--the sensible can not exist on their own…(this shows the inner working within the island).

 

The concept of sublime from the critique of the power of judgment, which is the stormy ocean with no horizon, where there is no ground to establish a point of view—the illustration or understanding of the ocean, to some extent, is based on the relation between higher imagination and reason, where imagination is constantly falling apart (due to the magnitude of the ocean. Scale and dynamic) and going forward with the demand of reason—and we can extend the magnitude and scale of the ocean to the island in this way. This is where we can relate to the ocean from the island.

 

There are two winds (these winds are what gave me the idea to start this new writing), as positive and negative magnitudes from the ocean (based on Kant’s example of the ship). Since the island is immobile; they are in a dialectical—zero--relation, and since they are from the ocean it means the zero--island--can open up to different dimensions. This can be the oblique way of movement and also the transformation of the body and the boundaries, with the use of intensive and extensive qualities and quantities, which can get out of stability—zero—with the idea of movement. The way of moving between combinations of virtualities and actualities—latitude and longitude--between zero and one--we can achieve different forms.

 

Part 3:

I am looking at different ways to construct the general structure, with new sets of group operations to analyze the structure of the ocean, creating different models of total space in relation to the observer and to itself. So I looked at Riemann, Elie Cartan, and Klein’s models--I also got into imaginary numbers and quaternions--in order to be able to create a geometric/perceptual system.

 

Some notes:

Here I am imagining new forms of spatiality, where there is no longer an interior and exterior or a given space. As the locale expands from a central and discrete position through the continuity of a woven strata of relations between separate locales, the nature of interacting points is rearranged and redefined, with torsions to the Outside.

 

Everything can be reconstructed. As the observers detach from inertial reference frames and the local perspectives, these local perspectives break into a multitude of different references and frames and abstract perspectives, reconnecting and binding by group operations. These operations and functions work in an abstract domain which is a Total Space.

To construct the general structure, we create new sets of group operations over the base space. The way we connect back these points or ‘fibers’ over the base space, allows us to apply folds and twists. As the general structure connects back to itself, it creates a twisted dialectic which abolishes the distinction between inside and outside, the local and the global. 

 

More notes from a different section:

 

ABSTRACT STRUCTURES: GEOMETRY

Principle of Duality: axiomatic approach- analytic approach – transformation based approach 

-The dualization translation function of language to itself

-Isomorphism between the structure and dual structure as a bijective function

Transfer Principle:

-The principle that connects -the principle that introduce the correspondence between two different theories, between two geometries, it preserve the relation between figures in two systems.

-Its structure-preserving


In Part 4- I am thinking about the basic time and space diagram of the manifold–intuition--and how it can connect to the ocean. So, here I did a lot of diagrams to explain this part. 

 

Some of the notes:


Diagrams of the island and ocean

Island \ Bridge \ Surfing

To build the flat surface of the ground upon the wave-ocean, specific time-frames (discrete manifolds) are stabilized with the y=0 as a straight line of the wave that paves the between spaces out of other curves. I am thinking about how many ways I can connect to the ocean waves as part of the continuous structure of the waves and magnitude forces. Diagram 1 and 2

Since I am not sending the diagrams, the text might be unclear. 

 

Island\ - plank-slats \floating\ anchored ship

The next diagrams are using the tangent or points from the wave which comes with the vector of movement and also addresses. And the island can be stabilized by a straight line based on this function – Diagram:3_4-

And that is the difference between two structures. (As we decompose and recompose the line and the point.) (Curve and the point) Also leads to two types of agent in understanding the time and the self.

Ship in the desert- dialectic of being/non being

Also, I am thinking of a diagram of vector space, for studying magnitude and the immobile ship. Pure magnitude causes gravity, while the ship is able to move.

 

Ship|\ocean—Waves and magnitudes

1- Bundle of references—space --- abstract structures and geometry of abstraction

2- Rotation and magnitude –time--------- - non-being/non-being relation

Also in Part IV--After a deeper investigation into the transcendental structure, I do some thought experiment, looking at how much of a transcendental structure can remain as a minimum account of agency as it moves--getting out of stability, by manipulating the first limit function that Kant imposed. ​I will look deeper into the hierarchy between categories: quantity and quality--empty concept without object; empty object of a concept,

the quantitative--since it’s moving or opening up to the ocean states, or heteromorphic structure of the ocean, is being exposed to series of presiding states--Mediation of States; here we are drawing inferences mediately –as distinct from immediate or intermediate= inferences, I am watching what's happening - this is built with the basic assemblage of kant’s time and space model in the manifold of intuition.

 

Notes:

Through sequences and series of analytic and synthetic,  preceding states of perception-- the ship driven down stream--we are moving entirely beyond our cognitive sphere. Since disappearances are the only thing given to us for cognition, for this, empty time itself does not cease to exist. Sequences of appearances and disappearances are not arbitrary, and it’s in accordance with the rule of the sequence of apprehension, which derives from the sequence of appearance, to justify appearance itself. The appearance must be grounded in the Transcendental object’s inner sense in relation to empty time itself; reality follows the empty time itself not by the state of things as a state of things that previously was not--the intermediate states--but by the state itself--mediate of state--which, the apprehension of, is not distinguished from the presiding states of perception.