Borna Radnik: Who’s Afraid of Subjectivity?

Study Group 2:  Who’s Afraid of Subjectivity?

Session 1: Hegel Saturday, October 3, @10am PST

Session 2: Dialectics, Materialism, and Contradiction Saturday, October 10, @10am PST


Session 1- Hegel


What is the thinking subject’s relation, if any, to the object of its thinking activity? Can philosophy think the object without any relation to, or dependence on, the knowing subject? This first session deals with these fundamental metaphysical problems by engaging in a close reading of Hegel. We will start with Hegel’s preliminary discussion of the relation between cognition and knowledge in the Phenomenology of Spirit in order to appreciate the subject-object relation. We will then briefly look at Hegel’s criticism with empirical knowledge in the Encyclopedia Logic, before turning to Hegel’s speculative philosophy. Finally, we will see why Hegel maintains that the distinction between idealism and realism is illusory

Readings:

1) Cognition of true knowledge.

G.W.F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. Terry Pinkard (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018), pp. 49-59.

2) Criticism of empiricism. 

G.W.F. Hegel, Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences in Basic Outline Part 1: Science of Logic, trans. Klaus Brinkmann and Daniel O. Dahlstrom (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp.78-82.

3) Speculative Philosophy in §80-82

G.W.F. Hegel, Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences in Basic Outline Part 1: Science of Logic, trans. Klaus Brinkmann and Daniel O. Dahlstrom (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp.125-133.

4) Hegel on idealism and realism in “Remark 2”.

G.W.F. Hegel, The Science of Logic, trans. George di Giovanni (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), pp. 124-125.



Session 2: Dialectics, Materialism, and Contradiction


In the second session we will turn from Hegel to Marx. Marx’s famous eleven theses on Feuerbach