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Lyndsey Walsh

Lyndsey Walsh is an American artist, writer, and researcher based in Berlin, DE. Lyndsey has a Bachelor’s in Individualized Studies from New York University and a Master’s in Biological Arts with Distinction from SymbioticA Centre of Excellence in Biological Arts at the University of Western Australia. Lyndsey is enthralled by the ruptures in the corporeality of culture caused by technology. They are also fixated on the creatures that are born from these ruptures, as they embody both collective cultural fears and technologically mediated desires. Lyndsey’s practice employs queer and intersectional feminist frameworks to question the tensions that can exist surrounding these creatures whose very existence resists cultural and anthropocentric binaries of human-non-human, diseased-healthy, and life-machine. Currently, Lyndsey is a visiting scholar and researcher with the Department of Experimental Biophysics at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, and they guest lecture at various institutions and universities. Their work has been exhibited globally and featured in art events and with institutions such as Frieze Art Week New York, the Humboldt Forum, the Ural Biennial, the Berlin Biennale, Transmediale/CTM, and more.



Artist Statement:

From the wheel to the internet, the world has become irreversibly and is continually made anew by technology. I see technology, even in its broadest definition, as an interface of interactions with the world and as an application of collective knowledge and cultural practice.


As an artist, I am interested in the ruptures that technology can create both physically in our world and also immaterially in our culture, politics, sense of identity, and even in our emotions and collective and individual imaginations. My work explores the instability emerging from these ruptures created by technology. I have become enthralled by the creatures born out of this instability, as they embody collective cultural fears and technologically mediated desires.


My work and practice set out to make space for these creatures in the broader context of the corporeality of culture, revealing how technology, life, and nature are entangled and ensnared in a myriad of networks and relationships. I employ queer and intersectional feminist frameworks to question how and why legal and economic tensions can exist surrounding these creatures whose very existence resists cultural and anthropocentric binaries of human-non-human, diseased-healthy, and life-machine.



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